Must Sees in Mexico

Mexico is a land of never-ending beauty. From blissful beaches to fascinating ruins and stunning natural wonders, there’s no shortage of enchanting sights. Whether you’re strolling the streets of bustling cities or exploring the rural countryside, there’s guaranteed to be adventure nearby. Keep reading to learn about Mexico’s must see destinations!

Cenotes

If you’re looking for a secluded piece of paradise head to one of Yucatán’s many cenotes. Cenotes are sinkholes that expose mineral-rich water below, and they’ve become a hotspot for swimming and diving. Often hidden within lush jungles or deep caves, their ethereal quality exudes a feeling of mystery and wonder. Cool off in the crystal-clear waters ebbing from turquoise to emerald to cobalt as you take in the delicate rock formations and mesmerizing scenery enveloping you.

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Copper Canyon

For those seeking unparalleled panoramas, check out Copper Canyon—a group of six canyons located in Chihuahua. Both larger and deeper than the Grand Canyon, you’ll come face-to-face with truly breathtaking views you have to see to believe. Hiking, biking, and horseback riding are all popular ways to explore the canyon, in addition to a railroad that runs through the rugged terrain. You may come across villages of indigenous people who live quiet, isolated lives deep within the canyon.

Museo Nacional de Antropología

The vibrant hub of Mexico City is brimming with history and culture. Take a journey back in time as you study the countless pre-Colombian era artifacts at one the best museums in the world. Set aside the better part of a day to really delve into all the museum has to offer, including fascinating archeological and anthropological finds from the Aztecs, Mayas, and other indigenous tribes.

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Palenque

Examine the ancient ruins of the Maya city of Palenque. Located in Chiapas, the site is home to some of the most impressive architecture from the Maya era and is known for its intricate refinement. The well-preserved area provides great insight to the Maya’s intelligence and sophistication when constructing the town, and hieroglyphics have made it possible for scholars to understand the city’s extensive history. Walk through the palace and numerous temples, marveling at these alluring ruins.

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San Juan de Dios Market

This iconic indoor market in Guadalajara is the largest market in all of Latin America. It can be a bit overwhelming, with an abundance of colors, smells, and sounds permeating the building. The stalls are overflowing with fresh produce, succulent meats, and vibrant handicrafts, and the enthusiasm and energy in the air is contagious. This market is the perfect way to experience the Guadalajaran way of life.

Tulum

If you can only visit one place in all of Mexico, many would argue that Tulum is the place to be. Resting on the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula, this town is truly a slice of heaven. It’s famous for having some of the best beaches in the country, with gleaming white sand and picturesque turquoise waters. But lounging in the sun isn’t all this seaside paradise has to offer—you’ll find well-preserved Maya ruins set against a striking backdrop. The ruins sit atop a steep cliff overlooking the ocean, lined with lush shrubbery and towering palm trees swaying in the wind. This one-of-a-kind destination is not to be missed!

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Tequila

Tequila lovers rejoice! Take a day trip to the beverage’s birthplace—none other than the town of Tequila. Located in Jalisco, it’s about an hour drive from the capital city of Guadalajara. Here, tequila is an art. Sign up for a tour to learn about the production process, from harvesting to fermentation, and sample the numerous varieties of the drink. It’s guaranteed to be a lively day in the sun—just remember to pace yourself!

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Cozumel

Less touristy than nearby beaches, the island of Cozumel is a dream. It’s hands down the best location for scuba diving, with glistening waters, diverse marine life, and one of the most extraordinary coral reefs in the world. For the less experienced, snorkeling is also a popular activity. Breathe in the salty ocean air, bike through town, and get to know the locals. The laidback atmosphere is infectious, and you won’t want to leave. Before you go, make sure to indulge in the endless supply of mouthwatering cuisine—the island is a secret foodie’s paradise!

Guanajuato

The colonial city of Guanajuato is known for its narrow, winding walkways, underground roads, and colorful buildings painted in bright hues. This charming town is full of character and history, and a visit here is a truly unique experience. It played a major part in the Mexican War of Independence. Hike up a hill on the city’s edge to Pípila Monument, honoring the heroic acts of El Pípila during the war. The monument offers the best views of the city, with a spectacular panorama that allows you to see Guanajuato in a new way.

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Oaxaca

There’s so much to see and do in the delightful city of Oaxaca. It offers the perfect traditional Mexican experience, as it hasn’t been developed the way other popular cities have. Learn about the culture of the local indigenous people, browse the Mexican folk art, treat yourself to the region’s delectable cuisine, and visit the many nearby natural wonders. The city is also known for having one of the best Day of the Dead festivals.

Chichén Itzá

Of course this list wouldn’t be complete without Chichén Itzá, one of the New Seven Wonders of the World. This archeological site was once one of the largest Maya cities, and it’s a top tourist attraction in Mexico. Historians believe Chichén Itzá was a culturally diverse society, showcased in the variety of architectural styles. The site can get pretty busy, but the experience is worth it. Rise early to beat the crowds, and be sure to check out the smaller ruins in neighboring towns.

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